On a recent Coffee Chat, Rocky Walls led a conversation about the myths related to video on the web. 

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Although Coffee Chats are not recorded, so that attendees have a safe space to drive connection and conversation, we wanted to share some highlights on common myths that are simply not true:

Myth #1: Web videos should always be short 

This is not true. It’s a good idea to keep things as short as necessary but the length of a video is based on the content shared and the interest by the audience. Even today, there is an audience for documentaries, TV programming, multi-part mini-series, how-to videos, or entertainment programs, as long as the content is great and there is an audience ready to consume it. Don’t make a video longer than it needs to be, but acknowledge that it is not a one-size-fits-all formula. 

Myth #2: Talking head videos don’t work

According to Rocky, this depends on who’s doing the talking. There are many people who are simply naturals in front of a camera and for them, looking at a camera to provide a message works and gives their audience the visibility that they crave. Create a format that is right for the person with the message. Some may prefer speaking to the camera live. Some may prefer something recorded in advance. Others may want to add images, and b-roll footage in order to enhance the video. Yet others may simply prefer a format where they are not visible at all. 

Myth #3: Overly produced/professional videos are dead

Yes, in this day and age of social media, many believe that impromptu videos seem more authentic. Rocky tells us to go back to what you want to achieve with the video - its purpose. Once you understand that, something impromptu may work better than something professionally produced, or vice versa. Let’s acknowledge that produced videos do require budget, so you need to think about where you want to make that investment. It may surprise you that 12 Stars Media, Rocky’s video company is starting to see a real comeback when it comes to professional videos. 

Myth #4: Always tell a story 

Storytelling seems to be the Internal Communication professional's latest buzzword, but when every topic is shared as a story, it can tend to be overdone. Sometimes, employees simply need the facts and direction told clearly and concisely; at other times, stories can help communicate messages in a more meaningful way. Again, by starting with a plan, purpose, and understanding your people, you will find the right time to insert stories in your videos. 

Myth #5: Once the video is complete, your job is done

This was a topic Rocky was really passionate about. Perhaps it was the fact that he’s aware of all the time and effort that goes into the video process, and then is amazed when the end result is treated as one and done. When creating videos, think of all the potential applications for the content you are creating. Where and how should it be launched? Should you make it an event? Where else should it be shared and seen? Where should it be archived? When it comes to video sharing, really put effort into your distribution plan so that you can make the most out of your investment. 

Myth #6: Since many of us are working home, video production is at a standstill

Although some work slowed down at the beginning of the crisis, and video production schedules changed, Rocky has noticed that work is starting to pick up. In fact, for videos required later this year, the planning process has officially begun, especially since some companies may have to regroup on their business-as-usual plans. We’re also seeing some innovative ways that organizations are creating video using stock footage or home-created footage by employees and customers. 

The bottom line is that video is still a useful tool to create communication, connection and a sense of community. It’s also an opportunity to celebrate and recognize great products, programs and people. Your role is to ensure that you do the planning that makes the most out of any videos you produce and share.

Looking to join the conversation? There are two more Coffee Chats this month featuring special guests on a variety of topics. 

On Wednesday May 27 9AM ET, Join Puja Misra: Building your Personal Brand, register here.

On Thursday May 28 Noon ET, we'll talk to Incoming IABC Chair, Bonnie Caver about Accelerating your Brand during Recovery , register here

We’re also working on our June line up when we will deliver them once per week on Wednesday 9AM ET. 

 

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